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Annika Hagen

A photo Annika Hagen took on her iphone in Brazil

How long have you been photographing?

Since ever I was handed down my first point and shoot, 11 or 12 maybe? my first proper SLR at age 18 I think, darkroom at 20 and so on. I’m 33, and still a long ways to go in the process!

What inspired you to get into photography?

Every member of my immediate family is a photographer, my father when he was young, my mother, Ute Hagen, is a painter who gains a lot of inspiration from her photos as well as selling them and my brother is a professional stills photographer in Vancouver, Eike Schroter. I held back for many years on seriously pursuing it, and stuck to writing and film, but it’s slowly grabbing a firmer hold on me.

Describe your photography in three words.

balancing emotional atmospheres

What is your favorite lens?

wide or macro, not yet entirely specific. I like a good zoom lens for the ease of jumping near & far.

What is your favorite camera?

I have a digital Canon Rebel Xsi and had the film version as well years ago. I also seriously love my iPhone for its portability (and would do about anything for the new Fuji Finepix!)

Where do you get your inspiration from?

…what’s out there, I don’t often go looking, it surprises me and I’m happy to try to grab the essence, balance the colours, the light and the dark. I enjoy the split seconds between seeing something and the moment you snap, often while driving. A lot of it is about what I try to leave out of a frame and the angles that take you in and back out, I guess that’s what inspires me.

Could you describe the process or idea behind your favorite picture that was in one of our shows?(above)

It was taken from inside a car driving into Paraty, Brazil, on the final night of carnival. There was a frenetic air of expectancy driving in that evening. A gorgeous old colonial town not hesitating to make their last night of the party the best. I have so many travel pictures of places that are so beautiful that all you really need to do is point a camera and it will look stellar based on these other man-made works of art and architecture. It’s often the random human or tree or flash of light that will make a photo special. That’s what really stands out to me about this one, there was no cropping, as it was from my iPhone, it was all about the surprise of human body synchronicity, in colour, form and movement, set against the old city with the light of this relatively new machine, the bus, pushing into frame that spoke to me.

www.annikahagenphotography.com

It was taken from inside a car driving into Paraty, Brazil, on the final night of carnival. There was a frenetic air of expectancy driving in that evening. A gorgeous old colonial town not hesitating to make their last night of the party the best. I have so many travel pictures of places that are so beautiful that all you really need to do is point a camera and it will look stellar based on these other man-made works of art and architecture. It’s often the random human or tree or flash of light that will make a photo special. That’s what really stands out to me about this one, there was no cropping, as it was from my iPhone, it was all about the surprise of human body synchronicity, in colour, form and movement, set against the old city with the light of this relatively new machine, the bus, pushing into frame that spoke to me.

Mr. Volk

How long have you been photographing?

“I started photographing in 2003 here and there to stave off boredom while living in a then remote area of Surrey. It was with a simple Sony point and shoot that was around at the time, of which some of the pictures from then I still have. I really started to take it seriously in late 2004, when a good friend of mine bought a top of the line point and shoot and began producing some amazing work. At the time I had no camera of my own and borrowed others P&S to go out on city walk abouts with him. I then met a great friend from Japan and she was also interested in photography. So we started to take her camera out almost daily and go off into the city streets and lane ways on 2-3 hour shoots. With her and my other friend I mentioned earlier, we began to collaboratively shoot and exchange pictures via email to critique and in turn slowly improve. I bought my first DSLR (Nikon D50) with the kit lens (18-55) in late 2005 and from there I never looked back.


What inspired you to get into photography? View full post »

Dawn Leblanc

How long have you been photographing?

I got my first DSLR for Christmas in 2005 and haven’t looked back since. Prior to that, I had a few film cameras over the years, but it was the advent of digital that caused me to get more serious about it.

What inspired you to get into photography?

As a graphic designer by trade, I’ve always had a strong interest in photography. At first, my motivation was in large part fueled by my desire to make it easier to obtain the photos I wanted to incorporate into ads and websites, but the photogrpahy soon took on a life of its own and I became completely engrossed in it for its own sake.

Describe your photography in three words.

Clean, minimalistic, colorful.

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